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Summer Fire Safety Series: Fireworks

Summer Fire Safety Series: Fireworks

Posted by Chance Kidd on

It’s a little ironic that the hottest months of the year also tend to involve the most fire-related social activities—you’d think we’d be looking for less heat! However, as the first day of summer rolls around this week, the camping, grilling season will be in full swing, with Independence Day not far behind. Since you only do some of these fire-related activities once or twice a year, it’s a great time to review some tips to help keep you and your families safe this summer. So here on FireAvert’s blog we’re going to have a Summer Fire Safety series for the next few posts, highlighting some of the most popular summer activities associated with fire that you’ll encounter in the coming weeks. To get you prepared for the 4th of July festivities in a couple weeks, our first topic is firework safety.

Every state regulates fireworks differently, from Maryland where all consumer fireworks are banned—even sparklers—to states like Missouri where residents are permitted to purchase all types of consumer fireworks. So before making a decision about whether or not you’ll be buying or setting off fireworks this year, make sure to check up on your state’s laws regarding fireworks to make sure what you do is legal.

If you are permitted to use fireworks, here are some helpful tips to learn before setting off that smoke bomb:

  • Never allow young children to play with or ignite fireworks.
  • Always have an adult supervise fireworks activities. Parents don't realize that young children suffer injuries from sparklers. Sparklers burn at temperatures of about 2,000 degrees - hot enough to melt some metals.
  • Never try to re-light or pick up fireworks that have not ignited fully.
  • Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire or other mishap.
  • Never point or throw fireworks at another person.
  • Light fireworks one at a time.
  • Never place any part of your body directly over a fireworks device when lighting the fuse.
  • After fireworks complete their burning, douse the spent device with plenty of water from a bucket or hose before discarding it to prevent a trash fire.

And remember, the safest way to enjoy fireworks is to attend a public show and not use them yourself.

For more tips and information, check out this webpage from the CPSC.

 


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